2666

 

listen carefully to what I have to say, comrade.  Im going to explain what the third leg of the human table is.

"Then Boris Yeltsin looked at Amalfitano with curiosity, as if it were Amalfitano who had invaded his dream, not the other way around. And he said: listen carefully to what I have to say, comrade. I'm going to explain what the third leg of the human table is."

So I just finished 2666 a few days ago, and I liked it quite a bit, although I still can’t answer the question I was asked by everyone who saw me reading it–namely: “what’s it about?”  In this way, and a few others, it reminded me of V. by Thomas Pynchon, another book I finished knowing that I’d need to read again before drawing any conclusions from what I’d just read.  Both books have fragmented, globe-spanning narratives that seem to somehow cohere in the end without revealing too much.  I’m sure that there’s more to be discovered than I picked up on in my first reading, and would like to give both books a careful rereading, but I think they both offer a lot to the casual reader too.  With 2666 in particular I was impressed with the ending, which manages to be an actual ending and provide some closure without bringing too many threads together or feeling in any way forced.

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